Piano, interlaced

Edition #51 presents three hauntingly beautiful piano pieces by Luzius Schuler, Matthias Gusset, and ttusk. Interlaced with more noisy tracks by Vomit Heat and Bahnhofbuffet Chancental.

Piano, interlaced
Luzius Schuler. Photo: Ralph Kuehne

In today's selection, we jump quite significantly stylistic borders. Three songs are distinct instrumental pieces, highlighting the power of the piano. Under the fingertips of Luzius Schuler, Matthias Gusset, and ttusk, the keys hit the strings in ways that make one shiver.

These quiet yet shimmering beauties are interlaced with two louder entries. Vomit Heat and Stella Summer transfer our consciousness into a state of disorientation and emptiness. Meanwhile, Bahnhofbuffet Chancental shout and screech in spectacular fashion.

Best,

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Check out the recommended songs in the playlists on Spotify or Apple Music. Also, follow Weekly5 on Bandcamp and buy the tracks if available.

ttusk – try ladybug

Tiemo Hauer usually writes pop songs, and he does so successfully. However, there's another side to the German artists—an even more captivating one, I might add. As ttusk, Hauer skips the lyrics and shines a light on minimalistic piano sound.

Inspired by renowned neo-classic artists like Ă“lafur Arnalds or Nils Frahm, he creates sonic snapshots full of melody and emotion. The second single as ttusk, try ladybug, is an achingly beautiful piece, padded with longing and slight sadness.

Vomit Heat & Stella Sommer – Leere

Leere [emptiness] takes notes from British post-punk as well as German indie bands like Tocotronic. In collaboration with Stella Sommer's sombre, conjuring voice, Cologne-based artist Vomit Heat perfectly captures the feeling of being lost in modern society.

Driven by a relentless rhythm, Leere features a breathless instrumental sensation whose monotonous nature contrasts Sommer's hovering yet meandering singing—ultimately creating a sonic trance.

Luzius Schuler – Crab Bay

A sense of peculiarity lies within Luzius Schuler's Crab Bay. Despite its tender touch, you can feel the rush of excitement, the playful creativity that the Swiss pianist unleashes.

Luzius Schuler doesn't shy away from taking turns. Crab Bay hesitates multiple times, only for very brief moments, to reorientate and slightly change direction. Wonderous, innocent, and curious like a child, Crab Bay wanders through its composition, always accompanied by a softly pulsating rhythm.

Bahnhofbuffet Chancental – Lösche

Bahnhofbuffet Chancental: It's the new band of Swiss musician and producer Neil Nein, who previously explored different music territories as part of bordeaux lip, Loreley & Me, and in his solo project Neil.9.

With Lösche, released as part of a split-single with Kaufmann's Easy Come, Easy Go, Bahnhofbuffet Chancental pushes the boundaries of noisy indie rock. The drums shatter the walls of underground clubs while the guitar soars sky-high. But it's the excessive use of autotune as a stylistic element that breaks with conformity.  

Note of Transparency

I personally know Neil Nein and worked with him on the same team.

Matthias Gusset – Bloom

It isn't the first time Matthias Gusset entered the Weekly5 stage: In February, the Swiss pianist was featured with Changes, a song as reduced as possible. Gusset's latest release, however, is notably different.

Bloom starts tipping lightly, only to become more complex, a denser composition not shying away from heavier steps and darker tones. A dreamlike quality, a hint of exploration, but indeed demonstrating the great storytelling potential of the piano.